Patient experience

Move, Groove Improve Quality Improvement Project

The purpose of this project was to reduce the effects of deconditioning and promote functional independence on an elderly care ward, with the ethos inspired by the End Pj Paralysis campaign. The first aim was for over 55% of patients to be sitting out daily for lunch on the ward. The aim was also for over 20% of patients to be wearing their own clothes daily on the ward. Secondary aims including improving patient experience, increasing staff knowledge on deconditioning and maintaining and reducing length of stay.

Getting the Know-How: The Feasibility of Delivering a Digital Self-Management Programme for Axial Spondyloarthritis

Despite recommendations by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence in the management of Axial Spondyloarthritis (AS), adherence to exercise and self-management education is reported to be variable. The Axial Spondyloarthritis Know-How (ASK) self-management programme offers service-users a single attendance exercise and education workshop supported by a self-management digital toolkit. The digital toolkit consists of a short educational film and self-assessment tool prior to attendance and an interactive self-management handbook to support health behaviour change following attendance. The feasibility of delivering a digital self-management programme for adults with AS was explored prior to implementation.

The effects of a new Tendo-Achilles Pathway (TAP) on an orthopaedic department.

Achilles tendinopathy is a common pathology that is considered difficult to treat. At a time of austerity in the NHS it is essential to have carefully designed pathways that are monitored in terms of cost and effectiveness. However, a paucity of evidence exists for what the “best value” dedicated “joined up” pathway of care is for this difficult condition. Design, implement and evaluate the impact of a new therapist lead pathway for Tendon- Achilles Pain (TAP).

Supported Exercise programme for Adults with Congenital Heart disease (SEACHange)

Congenital heart disease is a lifelong condition. Many patients will require repeated open heart surgeries during their lifetime and others may go on to develop heart failure, arrhythmia or other problems associated with acquired heart disease. The benefits of regular exercise are well known. The overall aim of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of introducing a supported exercise programme in to clinical practice to support physical and psychological well being in adults with congenital heart disease living in Scotland.

Priming elderly patients for surgery - the development of a pre-operative service for frail elderly patients

The Peri-operative Review Informing Management of the Elderly (PRIME) Clinic was developed in response to the increasingly frail population undergoing complex major surgery. Due to this, it was recognised that clinicians with advanced skills were required to manage and optimise this patient group pre-operatively, which led to the formation of a multi-disciplinary team consisting of consultant geriatricians, consultant anaesthetists, a senior physiotherapist and a senior occupational therapist. The aim of the team was to optimise patients from a medical, physical and social viewpoint.

The focus of physiotherapy input was to increase physical activity pre-operatively, improve respiratory function and identify falls risks in order to contribute to a reduction in post -op length of stay and improve patient function.

This service evaluation demonstrates the benefit of a highly specialised MDT model with frail elderly elective surgery patients.

Data analysis on the role of the Independent Prescriber in Physiotherapy led spasticity clinics

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the positive impact an Independent Prescriber Physiotherapist could have on the service delivery in outpatient spasticity clinics. The project aimed to demonstrate reduced patient waiting times for review appointments, reduced cost per appointment and demonstrate high patient satisfaction.  The overdue waiting period for spasticity reviews is a long standing problem for the spasticity service and on the Trust risk register. Historically spasticity clinics were managed in multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinics involving a Consultant and a Physiotherapist. A proposal was put forward to the team and agreed. This proposal was for a single Physiotherapist Independent Prescriber, with experience in management of spasticity and neuropathic pain, to set-up a pilot period of Independent Physiotherapy led spasticity review clinics.

Clinical Outcomes Review within a Musculoskeletal (MSK) Risk Stratified Model of Care

Measuring the clinical effectiveness of all healthcare services is a fundamental component of evaluating the impact care has on the service user. A community-based MSK physiotherapy service in Mid Essex has been using a validated and multi-dimensional outcome tool, the Musculoskeletal Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ), since April 2017 to evaluate clinical effectiveness.

The service also recognised the importance of working in different ways to improve efficiency and matching treatments based on prognostic subgroups (stratified care) has been shown to be both clinically and cost-effective in the management of low back pain using the STarT Back Screening Tool.  However, risk stratified care for all MSK disorders is in its relative infancy, with the Keele STarT MSK Tool yet to be fully validated scientifically, although Keele University granted permission for the MSK physiotherapy service to use the tool for clinical purposes in April 2018. 

The service was therefore able to collect data from all appropriate MSK patients receiving treatment from April 2018 to March 2019 to evaluate whether good clinical outcomes and positive patient experience were demonstrated whilst delivering a more efficient risk-stratified care approach.

A musculoskeletal single point of referral in primary care

A single point of referral was implemented in partnership between Allied Health Professionals Suffolk (AHPS) and Norfolk Community Health and Care (NCHC) forming the Integrated Therapy Partnership (ITP). This aimed to standardise the care pathways for musculoskeletal conditions and ensure primary care referrals are processed to the correct provider first time around. This should avoid unnecessary secondary care referrals, where patients are seen in secondary care, receive no treatment and are referred back to community providers. Referrals are triaged by senior physiotherapists. Similar models have been suggested as effective methods of service delivery by the British Orthopaedic Association (Lennox & Karstad, 2013). This was coupled with the implementation of online self-referral for physiotherapy and occupational therapy, where patients were issued advice and exercise within 24 hours. Advice and exercise are issued for patients triaged for physiotherapy through the single point of referral. AHPs are responsible all patient administrative tasks and provide the triaging clinicians. NCHC provide clinical physiotherapy, occupational therapy and orthopaedic triage services. This is contracted to the Norwich and South Norfolk Clinical Commissioning Group and they set key performance indicators for patients being seen. Routine patients to be seen in 28 working days, urgent patients to be seen in 7 days and orthopaedic triage patients to be seen in 14 working days.

Student-Led Neurological Rehabilitation Group

Adults with long-term neurological conditions have low levels of participation in physical activities and report many barriers to exercise. This study used a mixed methods approach to evaluate participant experiences and outcomes following participation in student-led, community-based neurological groups and to explore the feasibility of performing a full-scale study.

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