Learning and education

Move, Groove Improve Quality Improvement Project

The purpose of this project was to reduce the effects of deconditioning and promote functional independence on an elderly care ward, with the ethos inspired by the End Pj Paralysis campaign. The first aim was for over 55% of patients to be sitting out daily for lunch on the ward. The aim was also for over 20% of patients to be wearing their own clothes daily on the ward. Secondary aims including improving patient experience, increasing staff knowledge on deconditioning and maintaining and reducing length of stay.

Contributing to service development and enhancing patient care through the establishment of a balance class

The requirement for a balance exercise class was identified whilst working in a musculoskeletal clinic that receives many referrals for patients who attend with balance deficit. We needed a class that would allow patients to improve upon confidence, mobility, functional balance and lower limb strength whilst being fun and augmenting individual Physiotherapy care. This class would also free up the popular assistant rehabilitation clinics.

Assessing the impact of Physiotherapy Training on Emotional Wellbeing.

1 in 4 people experience mental health problems in any given year, 1 in 6 experience work related stress, depression or anxiety. Only 25% of those experiencing emotional distress seek and receive treatment, with many being dependent on the informal support of family or colleagues.

Physiotherapists are also encouraged to investigate Biopsychosocial issues with their patients, through management of persistent pain conditions and may not feel equipped to successfully interpret or manage the information that they receive from the patient. This additional stress can also impact on the Physiotherapists emotional wellbeing and have an impact on patient care.

The aim of this project was to ensure that all Physiotherapists have an appropriate level of emotional literacy so that they are able read/notice the signs of emotional distress in themselves and others and then act appropriately to support themself and others.

Supported Exercise programme for Adults with Congenital Heart disease (SEACHange)

Congenital heart disease is a lifelong condition. Many patients will require repeated open heart surgeries during their lifetime and others may go on to develop heart failure, arrhythmia or other problems associated with acquired heart disease. The benefits of regular exercise are well known. The overall aim of this pilot study is to determine the feasibility of introducing a supported exercise programme in to clinical practice to support physical and psychological well being in adults with congenital heart disease living in Scotland.

Student-Led Neurological Rehabilitation Group

Adults with long-term neurological conditions have low levels of participation in physical activities and report many barriers to exercise. This study used a mixed methods approach to evaluate participant experiences and outcomes following participation in student-led, community-based neurological groups and to explore the feasibility of performing a full-scale study.

Preparing the workforce for frailty in primary and community healthcare

The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a multidisciplinary assessment that identifies the medical, psychosocial, and functional needs of older people. This service evaluation considers the impact of training allied health professionals (AHPs) and community nurses to undertake a CGA assessment in primary and community settings.

Developing an evidence-based Making Every Contact Count (MECC) model of practice

Population health and prevention is a major priority of the recently formed Greater Manchester Health and Social Care Partnership and is an area in which physiotherapists can make a positive contribution. The Physiotherapy MSK services within the Bury Care Organisation, have successfully developed a MECC model of practice into their service pathways. This quality improvement, uses evidence based behaviour change principles to support patients in making positive lifestyle changes which can impact on their physical and mental health and wellbeing. It also aims to support Trust staff to become more active and promotes health and wellbeing within the wider communities.

Increasing healthy lifestyle conversations with patients in the community

The population of older people is rapidly growing and many are not living in good health; this escalating problem has significant economic and resource implications but more importantly impacts on individual quality of life in later years. In recognition of this 'perfect storm' the importance of embedding prevention strategies and health promotion interventions specific to older people is widely recognised. One approach to tackling this, Making Every Contact Count (MECC), empowers staff to initiate opportunistic conversations with people who report 'risky' health behaviours, supporting the first positive steps towards health behaviour change and self-management.

This quality improvement project was initiated following a record keeping audit which identified that healthy lifestyle conversations were recorded in only 19% of clinical records. It aimed to increase the number of documented healthy lifestyle conversations that clinicians have with Integrated Community Team patients.

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