Process changes

Move, Groove Improve Quality Improvement Project

The purpose of this project was to reduce the effects of deconditioning and promote functional independence on an elderly care ward, with the ethos inspired by the End Pj Paralysis campaign. The first aim was for over 55% of patients to be sitting out daily for lunch on the ward. The aim was also for over 20% of patients to be wearing their own clothes daily on the ward. Secondary aims including improving patient experience, increasing staff knowledge on deconditioning and maintaining and reducing length of stay.

Assessing the impact of Physiotherapy Training on Emotional Wellbeing.

1 in 4 people experience mental health problems in any given year, 1 in 6 experience work related stress, depression or anxiety. Only 25% of those experiencing emotional distress seek and receive treatment, with many being dependent on the informal support of family or colleagues.

Physiotherapists are also encouraged to investigate Biopsychosocial issues with their patients, through management of persistent pain conditions and may not feel equipped to successfully interpret or manage the information that they receive from the patient. This additional stress can also impact on the Physiotherapists emotional wellbeing and have an impact on patient care.

The aim of this project was to ensure that all Physiotherapists have an appropriate level of emotional literacy so that they are able read/notice the signs of emotional distress in themselves and others and then act appropriately to support themself and others.

Lung ultrasound in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis: A literature review

Adults and children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (CF) are regularly exposed to ionising radiation, from chest radiographs (CXR) and computed tomography (CT). This poses an issue as life expectancy has increased into the fifth decade of life.

Lung ultrasound (LUS) has the ability to assess many lung pathologies experienced in CF with accuracy close to CT but without the exposure to ionising radiation. The purpose of this review is to explore the literature to establish if LUS is being used to aid the management of patients with CF.

The use of a standardised outcome measure within the Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Services across a Trust in Staffordshire

Musculoskeletal (MSK) physiotherapy teams within Midlands Partnership NHS Foundation Trust (MPFT) historically used a variety of outcome measures including the EuroQol (EQ-5D-5L) alongside condition specific PROMS and a patient experience-reported experience measure, in line with Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) recommendations. However, teams used different outcome measures and data collection, inputting and analysis methods varied considerably.

In 2017, the MSK Health Questionnaire (MSK-HQ) was introduced and a data inputting and analysis calculator was developed following a consensus group exercise with the clinical and operational leads of MSK physiotherapy teams to facilitate the implementation of the MSK-HQ.

The effects of a new Tendo-Achilles Pathway (TAP) on an orthopaedic department.

Achilles tendinopathy is a common pathology that is considered difficult to treat. At a time of austerity in the NHS it is essential to have carefully designed pathways that are monitored in terms of cost and effectiveness. However, a paucity of evidence exists for what the “best value” dedicated “joined up” pathway of care is for this difficult condition. Design, implement and evaluate the impact of a new therapist lead pathway for Tendon- Achilles Pain (TAP).

Medicines optimisation for the treatment of spasticity and neuropathic pain led by a Physiotherapist Independent Prescriber

The purpose of this project was to improve medicines optimisation for the management of patients with spasticity or neuropathic pain who attended multidisciplinary specialist neuro outpatient clinics at West Midlands Rehabilitation Centre. The secondary purpose was to identify how much input was required to optimise medication after a change in medication was advised and if this input could be adequately carried out by a Physiotherapist Independent Prescriber.

Historically the Consultant (prescriber) would review and make changes as required to a patient’s medication for managing their spasticity and neuropathic pain.  Patients could contact in case of concerns, however, there was usually no medication follow up initiated by the Consultant between clinic appointments. This was due to limitations on Consultant capacity. Time periods between clinic appointments for each patient could be between 3-12 months depending on the request of the Consultant. This meant that if there were issues with obtaining or taking the medication and the patient did not initiate contact, the issue would not be addressed until the patient returned to clinic.

NICE provides guidance that the prescriber should review the patient with regards to their medication after starting or altering a medication within a timely period. This is important as it ensures that patients receive the right choice of medication for them, at the right dose and right time to benefit their health.

Medication reviews following a face to face appointment do not necessitate a face to face appointment and telephone reviews can be completely adequate.  This is because patient achievement of goals of treatment with medication is primarily identified through subjective assessment. The standard in this project was set that all patients who required a medication change in clinic would be reviewed, on time via telephone consultation(s). The time at which the patient would be need to be reviewed would be dependent on the time period in which the prescriber advised the medication change to occur over.

A musculoskeletal single point of referral in primary care

A single point of referral was implemented in partnership between Allied Health Professionals Suffolk (AHPS) and Norfolk Community Health and Care (NCHC) forming the Integrated Therapy Partnership (ITP). This aimed to standardise the care pathways for musculoskeletal conditions and ensure primary care referrals are processed to the correct provider first time around. This should avoid unnecessary secondary care referrals, where patients are seen in secondary care, receive no treatment and are referred back to community providers. Referrals are triaged by senior physiotherapists. Similar models have been suggested as effective methods of service delivery by the British Orthopaedic Association (Lennox & Karstad, 2013). This was coupled with the implementation of online self-referral for physiotherapy and occupational therapy, where patients were issued advice and exercise within 24 hours. Advice and exercise are issued for patients triaged for physiotherapy through the single point of referral. AHPs are responsible all patient administrative tasks and provide the triaging clinicians. NCHC provide clinical physiotherapy, occupational therapy and orthopaedic triage services. This is contracted to the Norwich and South Norfolk Clinical Commissioning Group and they set key performance indicators for patients being seen. Routine patients to be seen in 28 working days, urgent patients to be seen in 7 days and orthopaedic triage patients to be seen in 14 working days.

Using ANGEL taxonomy to triage referrals in Ceredigion community physiotherapy

To evaluate whether service improvements could be made to our community physiotherapy service through clinical streaming of patient referrals using underlying principles complexity science to consistently deploy the most appropriate member of the physiotherapy team to meet the needs of patients and improve the effectiveness of our service.

Physiotherapy Supported Discharge Service following knee arthroplasty

An audit on length of stay (LOS) for total knee replacement (TKR) patients following surgery highlighted that a number of patients were exceeding their predicted date of discharge (PDD), many due to not achieving traditional physiotherapy goals (90⁰ flexion, < 5 ° extension lack and good quadriceps function), despite being safely mobile and medically fit. This exposes patients to risk of harm due to prolonged stay within an acute hospital environment as well as inefficient utilisation of an in-patient bed. A Physiotherapy Supported Discharge Service (PSDS) had previously been piloted for six months. Phase 2 consisted of permanent service resign, continuing the PSDS and service evaluation.

Oxygen and Non-Invasive Ventilation Pathways in an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centre

Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a genetically inherited condition affecting more than 10,000 people in the United Kingdom. A progressive cycle of infection and lung damage occurs. Worsening lung function results in hypoventilation and ultimately leads to respiratory failure that may require supplementary oxygen and/or mechanical support such as Non-Invasive Ventilation (NIV). Guidelines support the use of NIV for nocturnal hypoventilation, hypercapnic respiratory failure and as a bridge to transplant. At the time of development, there were no published guidelines on the use of oxygen therapy in CF and no published pathways on the set up and management of supplementary oxygen or NIV in CF. This special interest report documents the development of separate oxygen and NIV pathways through interdisciplinary working in an adult CF centre.

Objective To develop pathways for supplementary oxygen and the set up and management of NIV in an adult CF centre.

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